Double Flame Job – Cornhole Board

We’ve been told that we pretty much paint anything, well, here is something, I’ve never painted…a cornhole board.

Yep, I got me a cornhole board!  I didn’t want your average printed/clearcoat version so of course I decided to do my own ‘flamed’ version.
I picked it up from St Pete Cornhole (Jon’s a great guy), it was all raw wood. I went ahead and did some minor bodywork to smooth out some knots etc and  primed it. Then I prepped it and sprayed it in a paint that I’ve had for about 10 years now. We called up to see how much it was a pint, and one of the pearl toners is no longer available. So this makes this project even special and unique.

I sprayed some black sealer, some of the black pearl base, then the midcoat which is basically a paint that has a lot of sparkle to it and it also has some color shift to it.  It’s actually a ‘color shift’ paint that changes from a green to a brown/copper color. One the extreme side view it has a blue tint.  Then I clearcoated it.
Once it dried, I resanded it, laid out the first set of flames, added a pinstripe. then I sprayed a dusting of the same midcoat over the black.  This really gives it a great look out in the sun!

I decided to add an extra step of airbrushed drop-shadows. Basically drop shadows are airbrushed on with a transparent black that will give the illusion that the flames are hovering over the base. Giving it more or less a 3D look at certain angles. You can see quite a few flames jobs in our Gallery that I’ve added drop shadows to them. Really gives a nice 3D look.  Once the shadows were done, then I clearcoated it once again.

I let it dry, resanded it, now I’m ready for the second set of flames.  Basically when you do an overlaying/intertwining, you have to pretty much ignore the first flame job. It can be quite confusing for a noob.  As you can see, I pretty much did the layout the same on both boards for both flame jobs. So they look VERY close to each other! I didn’t have to do this…but I did.

The second flame job was airbrushed which consists of a silver to green HOK paint. This also have a great amount of sparkle. You certainly can’t let this sit in the airbrush long as it will settle quickly on you. Then it clogs up the airbrush as the pearl flakes are bigger than normal.

Remove all the masking tape and Wahlah! double flame jobs.  If you look close you’ll see where I did a few licks so they ‘intertwine’ with the other flame job. It makes it so one of the flame jobs goes under the other flame job. I call this “intertwining” flames. Overlaying is of course where one flame job is laying over the second flame job.  In between each coat of clear I added an extra coat of the pearl just to give it more depth.

Overall, I probably have about $350 in materials alone. If you didn’t have the materials in stock, you’d be looking at about $800 in materials…..so I’m lucky to have these in stock 😊

I took it back to Jon at St Pete Cornhole and he put it together along with adding some LED’s around the hole for night play

I’m almost afraid of throwing some 16oz bags at it…well not really.  We’ll have some great fun with this!

For process and finish pics, click here

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